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Waymaker Podcast: How to build your own strategic command centre S1:E3

by | Apr 7, 2021

Season 1: Episode 3

Big idea: Waymaker is your strategic command centre. Every business needs one.

Transcript

How to build your own strategic command centre

 

00:02
welcome to leadership talk
00:04
the official waymaker podcast where we
00:07
explore
00:08
how your organization can achieve more
00:11
by doing less
00:22
well welcome to leadership talk the
00:23
official waymaker
00:25
podcast where we talk about how to
00:28
achieve more by doing less
00:29
i am your host craig hyman and with me
00:31
his ceo and co-f
00:33
oh no founder i was gonna say co-founder
00:35
like it was me but
00:36
not you’re just the founder stuart leo
00:39
welcome to the co-founding team craig
00:42
appreciate it i’ve just put myself on 50
00:46
please pop podcast twice it’s good to
00:49
um it’s good to chat stu hey stu last
00:52
episode we talked about like
00:53
seven questions um that we ask in
00:56
strategic thinking
00:58
we wanted to talk a little bit about
01:01
strategic command centers in this
01:03
episode
01:05
what’s that all about well um
01:08
waymaker is in effect a strategic
01:10
command center for your business
01:12
and it acts like that it functions like
01:14
that
01:15
and it gives you the power of that and
01:16
that’s actually a missing gap
01:18
in most people’s
01:22
thinking and technology set up
01:26
so you like the military analogies in uh
01:29
when it comes to business and strategy
01:31
it’s not because i’m from the military
01:33
i’m really not right um
01:35
i just think the the military and we do
01:38
have other analogies um stick around for
01:42
another podcast yeah okay
01:43
i’ll make sure we do but i think the
01:45
military um
01:47
they uh you know it’s kind of a zero-sum
01:51
game
01:52
you yeah you either get it right or you
01:54
don’t and when you don’t you really know
01:56
you don’t
01:57
whereas um so it hones strategic
02:00
thinking
02:01
you know there’s never a more important
02:04
time to think about
02:05
strategic thinking planning instructions
02:07
commands execution
02:09
when lives are at stake so right so i
02:12
think
02:13
the military or militaries um western
02:16
eastern
02:18
they hone their military practices
02:22
and their strategic practices more often
02:25
i would say um than the business world
02:29
because there’s so much more at stake so
02:32
yeah
02:32
that’s probably why there’s a few
02:34
examples so what does
02:36
so what does the business world need you
02:38
know
02:39
strategic strategic command center why
02:42
does the business world need
02:43
strategic thinking in that space in that
02:46
spatial you know why take
02:48
the analogy of a strategic command
02:49
center from from the military and put in
02:51
here well
02:52
actually you know um let’s look at an
02:54
example let’s go back in you know i love
02:56
my little history
02:56
uh yeah yeah there’s always a lesson
02:59
this is what i’ll actually look forward
03:00
to the most
03:01
each week your weekly session yeah a
03:03
little history lesson
03:04
so there’s that old saying to the victor
03:06
go the spoils everybody knows that well
03:09
to the loser goes the lessons um if
03:11
you’re lucky enough to survive the life
03:13
you survive
03:14
yeah so yeah so this is actually an
03:16
example of
03:18
military and civilian but so this is the
03:20
story
03:21
of the bay of pigs and
03:24
the bay of pigs 1960 61
03:29
it’s a u.s example i think we talked
03:31
british last time
03:32
um uh john f k
03:35
john f kennedy jfk was president
03:39
at the time um which
03:42
you know he was he was perhaps the more
03:44
trump than trump you know we shouldn’t
03:46
make this show political
03:48
we’re going to get it man we’re going to
03:50
get cancer
03:52
no political assertions aside but he was
03:54
the original president that made air
03:56
force one air force one
03:57
and made the presidential experience a
04:00
show and
04:01
and he did a lot of things in the white
04:04
house that changed the white house
04:06
right this is one of them um
04:09
so here we go um why do we need a
04:12
strategic command center well
04:14
it’s 1961 uh cuban missile crisis
04:17
is uh well if it hasn’t started already
04:20
the cuban issue
04:21
is huge in the us and um
04:26
the the us decided that they would back
04:29
the opposing guerrilla forces to help
04:31
take down
04:32
shay guava i could never pronounce his
04:34
name
04:36
thank you guevara
04:39
and they they plotted to
04:42
put a marine landing force on the ground
04:46
help arm the revolutionary forces
04:49
and take over cuba uh well they utterly
04:53
failed
04:53
and and so the bay so the bay of pigs
04:57
was where they landed to do this
04:59
and to kind of take over and beat the
05:01
cubans and the russians and
05:03
and put a new line of defense in they
05:06
certainly didn’t want missiles landing
05:08
from cuba
05:08
in american soil um hey you know that’s
05:12
fair enough
05:13
um the point is not
05:16
you know all the political issues around
05:18
the bay of pigs the point was
05:20
the u.s lost and they lost big and
05:23
right and and it was a very felt loss it
05:26
was quite embarrassing
05:28
um and and and
05:31
so when the u.s stepped back and said
05:35
okay what went wrong one of the key
05:38
insights
05:39
was that the situation
05:42
lacked real time information
05:47
coming into somewhere being coordinated
05:50
processed
05:50
analyzed and set up for decision makers
05:54
to make good decisions
05:55
with that real-time information so
05:58
that’s
05:59
that’s the key point and so jfk in his
06:02
wisdom
06:03
said well let’s let’s fix that and it
06:06
was jfk
06:07
that actually commissioned the work to
06:09
create the white house situation ring
06:12
so which we all know from movies you
06:14
know we’re we’re not americans we’re
06:15
australians
06:16
um yeah but uh you know we’ve watched
06:19
the rock or um west wing
06:22
or um 24 or
06:26
um give me something in the last 20
06:27
years
06:30
designated survivor thank you
06:33
um i was actually watching the rock last
06:35
night on television oh yeah okay late at
06:37
night
06:37
when i got home was so cool it was great
06:40
you can’t beat
06:40
nicholas cage at his best come on or
06:43
sean connery um
06:45
and and so um jfk instituted the white
06:49
house situation room
06:50
which you know probably the most famous
06:53
moment
06:54
in recent years of the white house
06:55
situation room is when
06:58
obama took down osama so yeah
07:01
uh if we all remember that scene when
07:05
um there’s peter with the pizza
07:08
was there pizza in the room yeah i think
07:10
there was pizza in the room okay all
07:12
right
07:12
could be wrong uh yeah okay uh well
07:14
let’s check you remember it differently
07:15
i remember it differently um
07:17
[Laughter]
07:18
so you’ve got pentagon officials you’ve
07:20
got um
07:22
hillary clinton as secretary of state
07:24
you’ve got obama you’ve got all the
07:25
leaders
07:26
of the then presidential team in the
07:28
white house situation room
07:30
which is actually called the john f
07:33
kennedy conference room
07:35
and it’s called that because after the
07:37
loss of the bay of pigs
07:39
jfk said we need a command center we
07:42
need a situation room where
07:44
when the poo goes down um
07:47
people are bringing information to the
07:49
table and that that’s processed and we
07:50
can communicate
07:52
and and so the white house situation
07:54
room is born
07:55
and okay and so the white house
07:57
situation room runs 24 7.
07:59
there’s data coming in from
08:02
both domestic and international
08:04
situations
08:06
interestingly this that one of the the
08:09
principles they set up in the situation
08:11
room
08:12
was that it would be a bipartisan
08:15
environment
08:16
so right whether that exists or not the
08:18
principles of governance
08:20
are leave your politics at the door
08:22
we’re going to analyze the data
08:24
yeah yeah yep and so on obviously that’s
08:27
right
08:28
and and the point is because if there’s
08:31
bias in there
08:32
then it will affect decision-making and
08:34
so
08:36
so the people in there are bipartisan
08:38
they’re appointed by their specific
08:39
departments
08:40
and all relevant departments of
08:43
governance
08:44
the ones that we know about and the ones
08:45
that we don’t um
08:47
you know have representation around that
08:50
table
08:51
and and there’s formal and informal
08:53
moments of
08:54
when situations happen then the the
08:57
leader of the free world as the
08:58
americans like to say
09:00
um uh we should
09:03
we we love a good american drama yeah i
09:06
can’t beat a good american action movie
09:09
um and and we like to rib out good
09:11
american friends too
09:13
um uh you know when that situation goes
09:16
down
09:17
um the situation room unfolds
09:20
well um every business organization
09:24
typically has a boardroom or a major
09:26
meeting room
09:27
it’s not quite the white house the
09:28
situation room which
09:30
you know is is has wooden panels that
09:33
reveal
09:35
red buttons and screens to world leaders
09:37
and
09:38
um you can’t talk directly to marines
09:41
and seals dropping out of helicopters in
09:43
you know in the middle east
09:46
but actually they need that businesses
09:49
organizations for-profits
09:51
not-for-profits
09:52
need a place
09:56
where unbiased data can come in
10:01
and that that data can be processed and
10:04
understood
10:06
and decisions can be made quite quickly
10:09
that have significant impact and
10:13
most organizations don’t have that they
10:15
have a boardroom
10:17
they might have some business
10:19
intelligence dashboards or some crm
10:21
dashboards or some reports or some
10:23
stuff sitting in a google drive or a
10:26
team’s room somewhere
10:29
but they don’t have the discipline of
10:30
the situation room they don’t
10:32
have because it’s more than just data
10:34
coming in it’s data coming in being
10:36
processed being understood and being
10:38
ready for action
10:39
it’s data that’s um interior that’s able
10:42
to be interrogated
10:44
it’s data that is predictive as well as
10:48
interpretive
10:49
and and more than that there’s a
10:52
governance
10:53
and a set of principles and behaviors
10:55
that when those people come to that
10:56
table
10:58
they can enact and execute and it’s not
11:00
the first time they’ve done it
11:02
um and and so why is
11:05
i was going to say why is the strategic
11:07
command center
11:08
in in the context that you’re describing
11:11
it
11:11
why is the information different to a
11:14
crm
11:16
or tableau or power bi dashboards or
11:18
something
11:19
well the key insight in the bay of pix
11:23
was
11:23
real-time information now i’m not
11:25
suggesting that that isn’t real-time
11:27
information it is
11:28
but it’s certainly not always real time
11:30
it’s often looking back
11:33
it’s often data that
11:36
is biased to one area often you have
11:39
great
11:40
dashboards on sales or great dashboards
11:43
on
11:45
marketing or great dashboards on
11:49
finance cx or whatever whatever
11:52
but rarely do you have a framework and a
11:54
methodology that takes all that data and
11:56
crunches it
11:57
and helps you process it through a
12:00
decision-making framework
12:02
and that’s really what waymaker is doing
12:04
and
12:05
and so what waymaker is helping managers
12:09
and leaders do
12:10
is shift from old ways of business
12:13
management
12:14
into new ways they that
12:17
they need a new set of tools that you
12:19
can’t always be looking backwards in
12:21
time
12:22
you have to be looking at now in time
12:25
and making um predictive
12:28
um and scenario-based decisions quite
12:31
quickly and so
12:32
what would what were the old tools that
12:35
need to be replaced
12:36
yeah well like what’s old tools and old
12:38
behaviors old skills and old systems
12:40
um you know i think there’s four big
12:43
ones
12:43
um okay uh so we’ll we might compare the
12:46
old to the new let’s do that quick okay
12:48
because that’s in a lot of our materials
12:50
and you can get this on our on our blog
12:52
posts
12:52
and in our training guides the common
12:55
old ways
12:56
is the classic command and control the
13:00
top down
13:01
waterfall cascading goals and objectives
13:04
we’ve got a 3
13:05
five and ten year strategic plan oh
13:07
that’s that’s great well done that’s
13:08
good
13:09
um the pandemic here how’s that plan
13:11
going
13:12
um financial crisis hit how’s that plan
13:14
going
13:15
new competitor popped up that does what
13:17
you do in 30 seconds
13:18
um how’s your plan going uh you know
13:21
that command and control
13:23
top-down waterfall cascading approach to
13:27
to life really doesn’t work
13:31
unless you’re in an extraordinarily
13:33
stable environment
13:34
and okay there might be some industries
13:37
that are more stable than others but
13:39
it’s rare so so that’s one um
13:42
the new way if we wanted to compare and
13:44
contrast that is
13:47
it’s not an opposite but it’s an
13:48
alternative it’s
13:50
it’s leading in power it’s it’s set a
13:52
goal
13:53
and navigate ua towards that and you do
13:56
that through bottom up
13:57
side to side insights and leadership
13:59
you’re aligning
14:00
value to goals you’re not aligning tasks
14:03
to milestones
14:04
that’s a that’s a big difference you’re
14:06
allowing values to goals
14:08
not tasks to milestones that’s good yeah
14:10
yeah so you know we
14:12
we all not all of us some some of us are
14:14
younger than us
14:15
um these days where old farts that were
14:22
that you are older i went to a parent
14:26
teacher interview the other day and the
14:27
teacher said
14:28
that i was middle oh wow yeah yeah
14:31
first time i’d heard it out yeah yeah
14:34
well we had our third child in our early
14:37
early 40s late 30s and apparently that
14:39
makes you a geriatric parent
14:44
in the schoolyard or is that a is that
14:45
like a commonly held term
14:47
is that that’s the medical term wow yeah
14:50
so anyway um off track so a a line a
14:55
line
14:55
value um driven a line
14:58
agile value driven goals so align value
15:01
to goals
15:02
um versus you know waterfalling
15:04
cascading milestones and tasks
15:05
it’s just a different approach um
15:08
it says look we want to get here
15:12
um that there is still a good goal to
15:14
get towards
15:16
um let’s let’s growth hack our way
15:18
towards it let’s
15:19
let’s align to value along that journey
15:22
let’s not just assume that the 20 tasks
15:25
set in front of us should be executed in
15:27
that order
15:28
if there’s a better way of getting to
15:30
task in step five
15:32
um do that we want to know about it yeah
15:35
because getting to the goal
15:37
that generates is more important than
15:38
how you get there correct yeah that’s
15:40
the point to make here and
15:42
and to do that you have to move from
15:44
command and control to lead and empower
15:46
you have to throw trust down the line
15:48
and you have to say
15:50
hey if you find a better way along the
15:51
way be a waymaker do you like that
15:54
um love it so uh so that’s the first one
15:58
the second one
15:59
i better move faster through these the
16:00
second one is number two number two
16:03
get rid of long-term planning cycles
16:06
it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t think
16:08
about the long term
16:10
but you need to think more effectively
16:12
about the long term i like the way jeff
16:14
bezos does this actually
16:16
um he says look we can’t
16:20
we can’t assume things for the long term
16:23
strategically we have to say
16:25
what do we know will be true in the long
16:27
term so we know
16:29
in the long term people will want cheap
16:31
things
16:32
that’s pretty much in the box of truth
16:35
so we can build strategy around that but
16:38
we
16:38
can’t build strategy around we know that
16:41
people will want
16:43
phones maybe there’ll be a new device
16:45
that comes along
16:47
and we’re all wearing glasses connected
16:49
to our brains you know that’s i’m being
16:51
facetious here
16:52
the point he’s making is what do we know
16:54
will be true in 10 years time
16:56
we can build around that if we don’t
16:58
know it to be true then it goes in the
17:01
in the it could change quickly bucket um
17:04
does that make sense yeah so there’s a
17:06
leadership teacher called craig rochelle
17:08
and he
17:08
often says when he’s speaking he goes
17:09
what i’m about to tell you i believe 100
17:12
for the next 60 days that’s right that’s
17:15
exactly what we’re talking about i love
17:17
craig um
17:18
long-term planning cycles are not wrong
17:21
they’re just not right
17:22
um and so yeah so
17:26
we shouldn’t throw our trust in them so
17:28
you have to
17:29
you have to go for the long-term goals
17:31
and align to value along the way and get
17:34
short-term wins so long-term planning
17:36
cycles
17:37
contrasted with short-term wins that’s
17:40
adopting an adaptive mindset that’s yeah
17:42
great plan deliver adapt
17:44
that’s that’s what waymaker is built in
17:46
it’s high speed feedback loops
17:48
it’s enough said
17:52
the third is shifting from functional
17:55
excellence to data intelligence
17:59
just relying on hiring good people
18:02
and having functional excellence to get
18:04
there is not good enough
18:06
you must have data intelligence you have
18:09
to have
18:10
multi-disciplinary multi-functional
18:12
problem solving
18:14
you removing roblox roadblocks using the
18:16
data in front of you you can’t just say
18:19
i’ve hired a great sales leader we’re
18:20
going to have a great sales team
18:23
that’s a part of the answer
18:26
and this is where this is oh gosh
18:29
don’t even want to say this because
18:30
people are going to hound me down but
18:32
you know
18:32
it’s where jim collins um in good to
18:35
great is you know get the right people
18:37
on the bus yeah
18:38
but get the right screens and the
18:40
dashboards and the intelligence on the
18:41
bus too
18:43
so those good people can operate in in
18:45
other ways i’m not saying he’s wrong i’m
18:47
just saying
18:47
there’s more to the story than that one
18:49
simple principle
18:50
so functional excellence to data
18:52
intelligence and then lastly
18:54
um moving from
18:58
stability maintaining the status quo
19:01
where failure is a sin and don’t speak
19:04
up
19:04
and hide the mistakes to shifting to
19:08
continuous improvement
19:09
where failure is a way forward ownership
19:12
and accountability where things
19:14
do break you own it 100 you own it
19:18
you don’t break it again you figure out
19:19
how to fix it and you move forward
19:21
and you you therefore reduce the amount
19:24
of failures
19:26
and and it’s a completely different
19:27
mindset and
19:29
i think we’ve all worked in
19:31
organizations or spaces where
19:33
failure is a sin and we need to move
19:36
to continuous improvement mindsets where
19:39
okay failure is not a sin um there can
19:41
be gross misconduct
19:42
sure but actually finding those
19:45
short-term failure points
19:47
are actually forward movement releases
19:50
and
19:50
and so that that’s why we need strategic
19:53
command centers that’s why we need new
19:54
tools that’s why we need to think
19:56
differently
19:57
and that’s why some of our old command
19:59
tools are stuck in the command and
20:01
control
20:01
long-term planning functional excellence
20:03
maintaining status quo
20:05
and we need to move into command centers
20:08
where it’s leading in power
20:09
short term wins data intelligence
20:11
continuous improvement
20:13
so yeah do that okay so we’ve got the
20:17
old way we’ve got the new way
20:18
how does how does waymaker
20:21
adopt some of these new ways of thinking
20:24
and pull that
20:25
information in yeah in a helpful way in
20:27
a helpful way well
20:29
um the framework the methodology of
20:32
waymaker sets up and says
20:33
we need to be continuously scanning
20:35
these these six areas
20:38
vision market strategy business model
20:40
customer experience
20:41
employee experience and when we’re
20:43
getting data from outside
20:45
and from inside coming in around those
20:48
things
20:49
where we’re processing that data in
20:52
in a consistent manner in an intelligent
20:54
manner so we’re surfacing
20:56
data that’s repeatable and we can
20:58
identify patterns in it
21:00
over time we get short feedback loops
21:03
across the organization we’re able to
21:08
get a picture of what’s going on around
21:11
us and within us quite quickly
21:13
and that’s really powerful that
21:16
that allows data to be crunched and
21:18
processed and for leaders to sit around
21:20
a table and go
21:22
you know we shouldn’t do that we should
21:23
do this and here’s why
21:25
or actually if we continue down this
21:28
path
21:29
we’re going to continue to veer off our
21:32
long-term goal
21:34
let’s readjust and veer back in to our
21:37
long-term goal
21:38
so waymaker one is is pulling in data
21:41
that’s holistic it’s not overweighted to
21:45
sales it’s not overweighted to finance
21:46
it’s not overweighted to one specific
21:48
area
21:50
it’s also not biased by
21:53
department or level of the organization
21:57
um everybody from from from the junior
22:01
associate
22:01
to the the chairman um
22:05
can be participating and engaged and
22:08
and therefore um that data is coming in
22:11
equal
22:12
that the the loudest voice at the table
22:15
is equalized
22:16
and standardized to remove bias and
22:20
that’s
22:20
it’s really hard in an organization
22:22
where you can’t afford to put on 16
22:24
joint chiefs of staff
22:25
and you know run something like what the
22:27
white house runs
22:29
so you also talk about um like a three
22:32
monthly
22:34
evaluation process is that
22:37
is that real time enough um well
22:40
there’s uh that’s a really good
22:43
point and a really good question you
22:46
need to have both formal
22:47
and informal ways of doing this
22:50
so great so the business as formal
22:53
approach is every three months you’re
22:55
kicking through this process
22:56
yeah is that real time enough i don’t
22:58
know it’s more real time than an annual
23:00
plan and
23:00
certainly a lot more real time than um
23:03
three to five
23:04
years strategy yeah but it’s not real
23:06
time if something happens last week
23:08
or if something happened this morning if
23:10
we know something’s gonna happen tonight
23:12
but what it does do is that operating
23:16
rhythm and that discipline you’ve built
23:17
quarterly is really easy to exact
23:21
today if you had to
23:24
you can say all right everybody um boom
23:27
um let’s look at our data seven
23:30
questions
23:31
um okay what have we got to adjust and
23:33
change
23:34
and we can adjust and change um and
23:38
communicate with precision by dropping
23:41
one two or three new key objectives onto
23:43
our strategic roadmap
23:45
and and everybody sees those the second
23:48
they’re in there and everybody can
23:50
adjust and adapt
23:52
and i i think that’s the power of giving
23:55
people
23:56
a framework and a methodology and a
23:59
system
24:00
to operate strategically and that’s what
24:02
waymaker’s doing
24:04
somebody said to me the other day when
24:06
they think about waymaker when it’s when
24:08
it’s in use they think about
24:10
um swallows um in the sky or birds in
24:14
the sky
24:15
and here in australia we get um
24:18
swallows and and and thousands of them
24:21
are
24:22
in a what do you call a herd of swallows
24:23
is it a herd a flock yeah let’s call it
24:26
um biology
24:30
a pod of swallows
24:33
yeah one one moves one one makes the
24:36
adjustment
24:37
yeah and and we don’t see each
24:40
each one of them going oh let me think
24:42
about that
24:43
i’m going to adjust course we just see
24:45
the whole cloud of movement changing
24:48
yeah and and there’s it’s almost like
24:50
they’re all in harmony
24:51
which they kind of are um that’s what
24:54
you’re doing with your organization
24:56
and and so waymaker lets you do that you
24:59
can turn
25:00
you could turn your staff not into a
25:03
flock of seagulls but into a flock of
25:04
swallows that that can
25:06
move uh in harmonisation and that’s
25:09
that’s both beauty in that leadership
25:12
but also
25:13
um really good leadership really
25:15
effective leadership
25:17
um that’s powerful so the formal process
25:20
kind of
25:21
trains us in the way that we think in
25:22
the way that we look at different
25:24
situations
25:25
and evaluate things after a while it’s a
25:27
lens through which we look right so that
25:28
we can
25:29
we can just like all quickly kind of be
25:31
on the same page because we’ve gone
25:33
through the formal process
25:35
um you know quarterly or whatever that’s
25:37
right the
25:39
the ability to um think fast think slow
25:43
is um a really powerful ability it was
25:46
um
25:47
i think i referenced this book um and we
25:50
get given a guy a book plug and
25:52
um in two podcasts in a row but yeah
25:55
um it it’s daniel uh daniel
25:58
kahneman kahneman he’s a jewish um
26:01
psychologist um that wrote this book um
26:04
thinking fast thinking slow
26:06
and the whole well not the whole but a
26:08
big premise of that book
26:10
is we train ourselves to think fast
26:13
by taking moments to think slow and we
26:15
apply that
26:16
into our thinking and we pick up those
26:19
mental models and we use them
26:21
and when they’re good mental models when
26:23
we have to think fast
26:25
those good mental models models come to
26:27
the surface and we execute
26:28
much like a professional athlete on a
26:31
football field or a basketball court
26:33
who can execute a movement because
26:37
they’ve trained their mind and their
26:38
body to execute that
26:39
quite quickly um and so what we’re doing
26:43
in in the the quarterly cycle is we’re
26:47
thinking fast thinking slow when we need
26:48
to think fast we’ve got a thinking slow
26:50
mechanism that comes to the foresee
26:52
and we’ve not just got the mindset skill
26:56
and the language built and the culture
26:58
built
26:59
we’ve got the technical system at our
27:01
fingertips which means if we need to
27:04
turn 100 200 300 000 people
27:07
and and move them across multiple
27:10
geographic locations you can
27:15
so stu strategic command center that’s
27:17
what we’ve been talking about today
27:18
and if our listeners want to find out
27:20
what that looks like
27:21
for their own business then they can
27:23
jump on waymaker.io and sign up for a
27:25
free trial
27:26
and subscribe to this podcast if you’ve
27:28
been recommended by a friend or whatever
27:30
we’d love to you to join us in the
27:31
conversation as we talk
27:33
more about how to achieve more by doing
27:38
[Music]
27:45
[Applause]
27:46
less
27:47
[Music]

What is a strategic command centre?

A place where real time information can be absorbed & analysed for decision makers to make the most important and most effective decisions quickly.

Ideally, the situation room is:

  • Apolitical
  • Representative of all departments
  • Always on
  • Able to operate anywhere
  • Strategic but highly focussed on tactics to solve problems
  • Receives information in
  • Clearly communicates instructions out

Listen in here:

The lesson from the White House Situation Room

If, ‘to the victor go the spoils’, then ‘to the loser goes the lessons’.

We discover how it was JFKs failure in the ‘Bay of Pigs’ Cuba crisis that led to the creation of the now infamous White House Situation Room.

This White House Situation Room is a strategic command centre.

Every business needs a situation room or a strategic command centre, we explore how Waymaker.io can be that for you.

Listen, watch or see the brief highlights below.

How can Waymaker be a strategic command centre?

Waymaker helps leaders find gaps across the whole of the business.

We do this through Waymaker’s Experience Curve Diagnostic which guides users through identify what business activities need improvement.

Here is an example:

Intelligent strategy software

Users can see specific functional activities and quickly identify gaps in clarity and maturity.

This is done across breadth and depth of the organisation.

Waymaker shows an Experience Curve Diagnostic for vision, market, strategy, business model, marketing, sales, service and employee experience.

Data is sourced from all team members, revealing the true picture of insight.

These gaps can be turned into Roadmap goals.

Roadmap with ease

Then, when goals are committed to a quarter, half or year, they are ‘In Progress’ OKRs.

All team members can see the strategic business goal and create their own goals aligning as needed.

Waymaker OKR iPhone hand - heart of the strategic command centre

Most importantly, teams can see dashboards and drill into what is going on to easily understand progress and what needs to happen next.

Waymaker Dashboards - your strategic command centre

If you have not tried out Waymaker, take a free 30 day trial here.

By <a href="https://waymaker.io/author/stuart-leo/" target="_self">Stuart Leo</a>

By Stuart Leo

Published on April 7, 2021

Stuart is the CEO & Founder of Waymaker. His background is in strategy, marketing & management. Stuart is a passionate believer in helping people find their organisation's true north and giving them the tools to get them there. When not exploring new ideas in leadership and management, Stuart with his family exploring the beautiful regions, islands and coast of Australia.

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